Tag Archives: set up

Golisopod: The New Behemoth Bug Type

Honestly, did anybody expect Wimpod to stay wimpy forever? I knew this little bugger was going to grow up into a monster, but Golisopod was not what I anticipated. Wimpod’s ability Wimp Out seemed awful to me at first, and I was hoping its evolution would flip the script a little bit and get an ability that does the opposite: scare out the opponent when your health drops below 50%.

But alas, Golisopod gets Emergency Exit as its only ability, which is basically Wimp Out but with different flavor text. But is Emergency Exit truly a deal breaker? And what can we expect from it in league format heading into Generation 7?

After all, what exactly makes Emergency Exit so “bad?” There’s a few reasons which I’ll briefly explain here:

  1. Emergency Exit activates after you are hit below 50%, not the end of the turn. With Golisopod’s base 40 Speed, you will often get switched out without getting a hit off.
  2. Golisopod is Stealth Rocks weak, so it wants to avoid switching at all costs. In the context of league format, drafting it is essentially inviting your opponent to bring Stealth Rocks against you.
  3. Being switched out against your will hinders your ability to set-up and sweep.

But taking a closer look at Golisopod, namely its stats, reveals some amazing potential. To get a good understanding of its bulk, it’s essentially got the same HP and defenses as Mega Scizor, albeit with a worse defensive typing. (It has 75/140/90 bulk to be precise.) That bulk is valuable to a Pokémon like Golisopod, which will generally always be in fear of dropping below 50% HP. In fact, no matter what way you look at it, Golisopod will always have that issue.

But along with that bulk, Golisopod packs a punch with 125 base Attack, which is respectable for sure.  So, it appears that looking at stats alone, Golisopod has a lot of things going well for it. But what exactly can it do with these stats? What about its movepool?

Primarily, lets cover its signature move, First Impression. First impression is a +2 priority Bug Type Move with 90 Base power, but it can only be used on the first turn it is sent out. This makes First Impression the strongest priority move currently in the game. It functions extremely well with Golisopod’s “crippling” ability, believe it or not, since it acts as a reset button for this move. This makes Golisopod a potentially great revenge killer.

Other highlights of Golisopod’s movepool are as follows:

  1. The newly buffed Leech Life, which is now an 80 base power healing move, which ties with Oblivion Wing as the strongest HP-draining move, unless you count Dream Eater.
  2. Water STAB moves like Razor Shell and Liquidation, both which have a chance to lower the opponent’s Defense. Nice and spammable.
  3. Priority moves in Aqua Jet and Sucker Punch, and of course, First Impression. Although Sucker Punch is now 70 base power this generation, it’s strong enough to help mitigate Golisopod’s poor speed stat.
  4. Yup. Golisopod can set up some hazards if you need it to. This is especially notable for league play, where hazards play a big role in preparation and counter-team building.
  5. Physical coverage moves including Rock Slide, Poison Jab, Brick Break, and Aerial Ace. (Yeah, I know those last two moves aren’t all that impressive, but they could be useful in a league match where movesets tend to get a little funky sometimes.)

There’s two last moves that deserve their own separate section, and not just a bullet point. Substitute and Swords Dance. Based on its ability, Golisopod seems like the last Pokémon you’d want to set up with, because you’d just get ejected at some inopportune time and lose all your stat boosts. But with the threat of First Impression, you can force the opponent to switch, which can be your opportunity to set up a Substitute. A nice quirk in Emergency Exit’s mechanics is that Golisopod will not switch out if its health is dropped below 50% from Hail, Sandstorm, or Substitute. It also won’t switch out if an item like Sitrus Berry keeps it above 50% once activated.

Behind a substitute, you’re free to go for a Swords Dance or two, and with Aqua Jet as a STAB priority move, sweeping with Golisopod is much more achievable than it would seem on paper.

In that sense, Emergency Exit is truly both a blessing and a curse. Just like with every Pokémon, you must play to its strengths and not its weaknesses, or better yet, turn those weaknesses into strengths. Used correctly, Golisopod has the tools to overcome its ability, and even use it as an advantage on occasion. Whether you set up and sweep or set up hazards, slap on a Choice Band or a strap on an Assault Vest, there’s plenty of things you can do with this beastly bug type.

I see this thing having a bit more success in draft leagues than I do in normal Smogon tiers. Behind the right coach with a well-drafted team and some smart movesets, this Pokémon can really shine. I know you could say that about pretty much every Pokémon, but with an ability like Emergency Exit, I feel like Golisopod needs a little bit of defending, as I can already tell many people will write it off because of its ability alone.

But don’t be afraid to use this monster! We’ve been waiting since Surskit for a usable Water/Bug type, and this generation we were introduced to two. And if you learn how to use it well, it will be your opponent that Wimps Out against you!

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How Emvee broke the format

by:Wutpulver

Emvee joined the GBA for Season 6 and immideately made a splash, without having prior draft experience. He assembled a unique team and abused some of the quirks of the counter team format.

Building a core

In case you need to refresh your memory, here is Emvees draft recap. The first three picks are fairly standart. Dragon/Fairy/Steel cores are very common and for good reason. Notable is the inclusion of Togekiss since it counters the added ground weakness that Mega-Ampharos brought to the trio. These three pokèmon do not leave many holes to be filled by later picks since they have the option to set Stealth Rocks, Defog and U-Turn. So far this isn’t really innovative but it is a solid foundation for whats to come.

Weaknesses

There are only 2 notable weaknesses that I could make out. First is the lack of strong fire attacks. Fire is one of the most important attacking types and a Togekiss or Gyarados Fire Blast is not exactly the strongest Fire coverage.

Second is the lack of recovery. Outside of Togekiss, every Pokémon of the Chimchargers has to resort to Rest to gain some HP back. This results in the team losing steam in drawn out battles.

Set up

Four of Emvees pokèmon are very well known as set up sweepers. Haxorus, Gorebyss, Gyarados and Slurpuff are famous for just that. It doesn’t stop here though. We’ve seen Rock Polish Donphan, Agility Mega-Ampharos and even Swords Dance Keldeo during the season. Almost every Pokémon on the roster can take over a game and be a win condition. This is incredibly important in counter team formats since it is impossible to check every single threat this team presents. What makes set up based teams even more effective is the tier system. No team can consist only out of top tier pokèmon wich makes it very hard to keep up the pressure and not offer too many safe turns. A tier 4-5 Pokemon is usually not able to threaten an OHKO, which opens up a lot more opportunities to run away with the game. In 7 out of the 12 regular season games, Emvee managed to have 1 Pokémon that killed at least half of the opposing team. Together, with Emvees tendency to bring very unusual sets, this team style makes it incredibly hard to prepare and play against it.

Will this change the meta?

I believe that this team archetype is superior to the ones we’ve been seeing so far and fully expect more coaches to try piloting one next season. The more common it becomes, the easier it will be to counter, since phasing will be the best way of working around it and teams will include more and more of these in their plans. I do think that this should have an impact on how the GBA is played and am curious to see how the drafts will develop.

[October 14th 2016]