Tag Archives: vgc

Speculation and discussion on rules for Sun/Moon VGC

by NewGame+

Earlier this week, we were treated to a new Sun/Moon trailer. Along with that, the official site updated with the rules for the upcoming VGC ’17 season. The newest and most notable rules are as follows:

  • NO MEGAS WILL BE ALLOWED
  • Each player will have only 60 seconds to choose a move, with a total of ten minutes for the battle. If either player runs out of their ten minutes, they automatically lose.
  • Only Pokemon found in the Alolan Pokedex will be allowed

In this article, I’ll discuss each of the points and what they (could) mean for VGC in the future. Also, before I begin, I recommend reading Wutpulver’s VGC speculation article. In that article he discusses in depth on his thoughts of specific Pokemon on their roles in VGC ’17, so read that one first.

Only Pokemon found in the Alolan Pokedex will be allowed

This is the first biggest rule for VGC ’17. Many people have had issues with the currently allowed Pokemon for a few years, including the very infamous CHALK set (Cresselia, Heatran, Amoonguss, Landorus-T, Kangaskahn). Since these Pokemon were always found on a team in one form or another, the meta began to grow a bit stale. Now, however, assuming that most/none of these Pokemon will be found in Alola, the meta will have a lot more breathing room. Add in the fact that many of the newly introduced Pokemon seem to be oriented towards VGC, and it looks promising as to what kind of teams we’ll be seeing in the upcoming season. And that also leads us to…

NO MEGAS ALLOWED

This is another big one, since many people were upset with the way Megas dominated the format (Mega Kangaskahn in particular). Megas have dominated the scene ever since they were introduced, from M-Kanga, Garchomp, and T-Tar in VGC ’14, to M-Rayquaza, Primal Groudon and Mega… Kangaskahn… again… in VGC ’16. This is fairly huge because

 1) strategies will no longer be oriented around allowing/preventing a Pokemon to sweep as a mega, and 

2) the guessing game as to which Pokemon will be Mega is eliminated. You look at a team with Alakazam, Sableye, Tyranitar, and Garchomp, and there’s no telling which one is going to be the Mega (plot twist, it’s the Audino that you completely forgot about). And now, we move on to the final (and perhaps most important) rules introduced…

Each player will have only 60 seconds to choose a move, with a total of ten minutes for the battle. If either player runs out of their ten minutes, they automatically lose.

VGC ’16 saw quite a few stall tactics in which players would either win by stalling the timer, or would realize they were going to lose unless they stalled the timer. After many complaints by players (and, most notably, a certain wolf), it’s no wonder why they added what’s known as the “chess timer”. Now, for those of you unaware of what a chess timer is, it’s a timer that’s used in chess (as the name implies). Time is granted to each player rather than to both at the same time, to prevent players from winning by stalling the time. Each player has a total amount of time (in this case 10 minutes), and if a player allows this time to run out, then they lose. Period. This is absolutely necessary to stop people from winning via time stalling, and also stresses making plays in a quick and timely manner. This can also help for various official tournaments, as the timer can help matches end quicker and therefore have more done in a single day.

What are your thoughts on what’s in store for VGC ’17? Discuss in the comments below, and if you haven’t, check out Sun/Moon VGC Speculation if you haven’t already.

October 9, 2016

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Sun/Moon VGC Speculation

by: Wutpulver

How can someone predict how a format, that is not even announced yet, filled with Pokèmon whose stats we don’t know will turn out? Well you can’t, wich is why you should take everything I am going to say with a huge grain of salt.
Instead I am going to look at things that MIGHT be interesting for the upcoming format.

The first Pokèmon I want to look at is also one of my favourite designs: Oranguru. Starting with things we actually know both of its abilities are quite useful in doubles. Inner Focus stops the always common Fake Out while Telepathy has great synergy with its signature move Instruct. This move causes the targeted Pokèmon to immediately repeat the last move it used. Did you ever feel like your Garchomp’s Earthquake needed to deal double damage while leaving your second Pokèmon unscathed? If you did, then Oranguru is your ideal partner. Right now, it seems that it will be a support Pokèmon best paired with fast heavy hitters. The typing Normal/Psychic only has two weaknesses, which are Bug and Dark. Based on its design I predict low speed and strong bulk. How high these stats turn out will decide how important Oranguru will be in the upcoming meta. Its movepool will also play a huge role. I can see it getting Trick Room and Fake Out but these are very uncertain so lets move on instead.

Jangmo-o is mainly interesting because of its ability Soundproof. A dragon that is immune to Mega-Gardevoirs and Syleons Hyper Voice is bound to have some uses. Due to its revealed moves so far (Headbutt, Dragon Tail) I predict it to be a physical attacker along the lines of Haxorus. Its speedtier will be one of the crucial factors for its power.

Lycanroc-Day has quite a few interesting characteristics. Rock is a useful typing since it is great offensively and a counter to the always dangerous Talonflame. Sand Rush will be powerful if Tyranitar or Hippowdon have any place in VGC 17. Its signature move Accelrock is the first priority rock move and probably the biggest reason for excitement. I predict Lcanroc-Day to be a fast, fragile attacker that will make use of STAB Rock Slide and Accelrock to carve its niche.

Alolan Ninetales has an amazing offensive typing. The ultimate dragon hunter. Its viability will almost entirely depend on its speed and special attack. Should it be a prominent member of the new meta players will adapt and bring Bullet Punch on almost any team. Because of this I do not believe it will ever be dominant but a good fix for teams weak to Dragon.

Tapu Koko and Alolan Raichu have to be discussed together due to the obvious synergy of their abilities. Tapu Koko sets Electric Terrain on entry, while Raichu’s speed is doubled while Electric Terrain is active. These two share a typing in Electric and Earthquake as a weakness. Magnet Rise is a possibility but denies themselves the Electric attack bonus that the terrain offers. Raichus current speed is fairly high anyway wich makes the speed boost pretty irrelevant. This is why I hope that Alolan Raichu will have decreased speed and a significant boost in either bulk or special attack. Tapu Kokos signature move Nature’s Madness acts like an electric Superfang and will probably not be used much. I do not think the electric duo will have much of an impact and do not see an archetype developing around Electric Terrain unless more pokemon that benefit from it are released soon.

The most overhyped doubles pokèmon so far is probably Oricorio. Most poeple saw its ability and immediately tried to build combos with Volcarona, Salamence and Gyarados. The problem is that you have to protect your set up Pokemon either with redirection or flinching. Should Oricorio be a support Pokèmon that learns Follow Me or Fake Out, it will not have the offensive potential to make use of the free stat boost. If it is indeed offensive it will not be able to protect its partner properly. Aside from that it mostly looks like a gimmick to me and I don’t expect a high or even respectable BST from it.  The concept could be promising but I am afraid I can’t believe the hype.

[Oct 4th 2016]